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Plinth House
LAND Arquitectos

The commission was a house for a surfer and his family that would rescue typical elements of the architecture of the area in a contemporary way, and to create spaces protected from the cold southern wind (a constant in the area) and management of the afternoon sunlight, without impairing the view to Punta de Lobos (surf point) in this same direction.

Maison Mentana
EM architecture

A former 4-plex later combined into a duplex, the project consisted in transforming this 1900’s property into a contemporary single-family home, with a small addition in the back. The existing two-storey building was half abandoned and in need of major renovations. After completely gutting the interior space, the structure was modified to remove all interior walls as well as the back wall.

Neumannhaus
ITN Architects

This project is a renovation and extension to an old 1880’s Victorian brick house in an old suburb of Melbourne Australia. The new building at the rear of the house consists mainly of one large L shaped open plan kitchen, living and dining area with large glass doors across the rear verandah porch, as well as other utilitarian rooms.

House Savukvartsi
Honkarakenne

A modern eco-home for three generations Savukvartsi was introduced to the public at the Housing fair 2015 in Vantaa, Finland. It’s an ecological duplex house, designed for three generations of a family. Honka Savukvartsi is an excellent example of a new-generation log home, created with the Honka Fusion concept.

Glebe House
Nobbs Radford Architects

The project is not primarily focused on the connection to external spaces but looks inward with interconnections of cloistered spaces, created and selected framed openings. The outer concrete elements contrast with the timber elements that further define the various internal zones and functions within the house.

Noyack Creek
Bates Masi Architects

The client, a New York actor, sought a retreat for relaxation and casual entertaining on a restrictive narrow lot fronting the tidal estuary of Noyack Creek. The house became a study in architectural theatre: a series of spaces in a carefully scripted sequence that subtly reflect his professional life.

Beachyhead
SAOTA

The clients approached SAOTA to design a family holiday home that responded to the site, especially the views. They wanted a relaxing, yet elegant home that would be comfortable when entertaining many guests whilst also feeling intimate and cosy when it’s only one or two of them in the house. The house was conceived as a simple box, floating over the dune, capturing and framing the view. The outer shell of the box is finished in a rough textured concrete, contrasting with the smooth reveal and soffit that tapers to create a delicate frame.

Bungalow Court Brighton
Steve Domoney Architecture

Set in a quiet leafy cul-de-sac in the bay side suburb of Brighton, the first glimpse captured of our Bungalow Court project is of the kite-like roof canopy sailing aloft a solid upper level ‘hull’. It hovers seemingly unsupported, with only the presence of a narrow band of horizontal glazing beneath to suggest a connection to the solid form below. The intentionally whimsical form the roof assumes, signals the design response reinforced throughout this free flowing family home. We aimed to engender an air of relaxed sophistication, a calm welcoming place that would stimulate the senses and instil a sense of wellbeing.

Hope Street Geelong West
Steve Domoney Architecture

This unusually wide site of generous proportions accommodating only a modest single level weatherboard period cottage, afforded the opportunity to develop the site to best suit the needs of a growing family. In retaining the existing cottage, due respect has been paid to the rhythm of existing heritage cottages along the streetscape. Historic threads are made evident and are read from the street with the new contemporary portions of the house, now in conversation with the old. The new is clearly defined against the existing through the application of tonal contrast. The old is treated in monotonic white, whilst the new presents itself in a relieving charcoal toning behind. This charcoal undertone extends throughout the interior of the new work providing a canvas, to which lively primary colours are applied throughout. These played out in both the fixed joinery elements and loose furniture selections of interior designer Andrew Parr. Now fused, the existing and new portions of the house provide very different opportunities for use, the existing smaller rooms of the cottage serve appropriately to accommodate the bedroom and utility spaces of the house, whilst the new; over a two level rise; provide a more open flowing arrangement of space, visually interconnected and conducive to the needs of a contemporary young family. The integration of the garden spaces and pool with the house is achieved through a transitional outdoor covered area, extending through both levels and punctuated by an enclosing vertical timber battened screen, this offering protection from the elements for outdoor activity and a filter to sunlight entering the interior. The completed home offers robust family accommodation without compromising the qualities necessary to provide a stimulating space for daily life.

Bundaroo House
Tziallas Omeara Architecture Studio

The brief for this project was to design a beautiful addition to a heritage listed Bowral cottage - one which was private and allowed the existing cottage to appear unchanged from the street. The clients were passionate about restoration of the original parts of the building, and replacing the dysfunctional 1980's addition to the rear of the building. The additions were to maximise the solar-passive performance of the house, create a large entertainers kitchen in the heart of the home, allow for a new living and dining area, provide for a new sunken media room and guest accommodation. The client was keen to explore a contemporary approach to the new work, allowing for the new addition to juxtapose with the original weatherboard cottage. Most importantly, the house had to 'work well' from an environmental performance perspective. The new additions have been detailed to eliminate thermal bridging, create a well insulated and airtight envelope and to maximise passive solar heat gain and natural cross ventilation. The house has been designed to capture the sunlight in winter, and to exclude it from heating up the spaces in summer. A geo-thermal heat recovery system heats the pool, floor slab and domestic hot water and 35kW of solar panels provide more electricity than the occupants are likely to use (feeding the surplus back into the grid). A charging station in the garage powers an electric vehicle.

Armandale House 1
Mitsuori Architects

Our clients, a professional builder and his family called for an elegant and striking contemporary design solution to transform this compact double fronted Victorian style house into a generous family home. 
The design concept proposed a sculptural two level addition that connects seamlessly to the north facing landscaped courtyard, terrace and garden. Special consideration was given to preserving the historical streetscape, with the new addition separated from the existing building by a glazed walkway to acheive a large street setback making the new addition invisible from the front. 
 The architectural solution utlises series of simple folded planes to define spaces, control views, shade windows, and articulate the form of the building so as to reduce the visual impact of the first floor when viewed from the rear garden. This is a design that appears simultaneously striking or discreet depending on where it is viewed from. 
 This project was designed in close collaboration with our client, a professional builder with a focus on construction detailing and buildability. The rigour and practicalities of the building process were present from the outset and informed the original design concept. As architects with a keen interest in the building process, we found this particularly rewarding and engaging.

Ming House
LGZ Taller de Arquitectura

The design of the house generates a perception of spaciousness well above the square meters of actual construction. Each one of the generated spaces follow the priority of extending the sight lines: the long entrance corridor that elongates through a linear garden outside; the long stairs that links the second level with the first one and continues towards the length of the swimming pool; every distributing zone visually reaching a perspective of the inner patio. The ample roof heights, as well as the design of ceilings emphasize the perceived spaciality, contributing to this factor also the strategic positioning of windows and skylights, which enhance natural light while blocking the not-so-engaging views of nearby built context and framing the better views of natural background. The simplicity of the exterior form reflects the inwardly attitude of the house: closed from the outside world, safely open from the inside. Materials alternate in series of contrasting themes that articulate interior and exterior design: from the white purity of the walls, through the dark stone tones of the floor, the sandy colors of the main wall that connects the main length of the project, to the natural wood tones in furniture, decks and art objects. Nature flows in and around the house and enriches it. The posterior garden is populated by native plants (from grasses, shrubs, oak trees) which have low maintenance and water requirements. The interior patio affords great views of the green wall from the first and second floor bringing shadow, freshness and relaxing views to every interior space in the house.