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ELL
Domaen LTD

ELL is a 5,500SF ground-up Beverly Hills Spec residence designed for Luxe List. The building is located at the crest of the Benedict Canyon hillsides, overlooking the entire serene landscape of the Beverly Hills neighborhood. The project is loosely situated within the footprint of a former, now demolished, one-story 1950s residence. The construction and development faced multiple challenges, including a shortened design and submittal phase – two months – and a steep slope on the existing site, with the only, feasible flat portion being maximized by the original. Domaen consciously decided to expand the exterior and infinity pool into the steep slope, supported by long caissons, and to keep the existing footprint of the original building. This enabled to permit it as a remodeled residence and so overcome extreme setback and building restrictions of the local Baseline Hillside Ordinance. Despite the physical limitations of the existing footprint, the building employed an open floor plan and vertical extension for a contemporary, practical response to the increasingly difficult agenda of building in the hillsides of Los Angeles. A design-build methodology was employed and streamlined to meet a fast moving schedule, with the dynamic design process that evolved during construction. The methodological constraints of the project led to explorations of an ‘elevational’ architecture, focusing on systemic alignments and misalignments as tools to create a dynamic, yet minimal façade. Formal elements are subtle, accentuated, and exaggerated. Planes are simultaneously thickened and destabilized through the opening of corners and separation from the ground surface. This technique allowed maximum freedom in developing a loose plan that emphasizes zones rather than rooms, which is played out with various degrees of privacy; the building is obscured to the street-front, yet completely open to the scenic view in the West. The ground-floor opens up to the elements using the architecture as framework for views of the landscape beyond. The second floor, which features the most private areas has a discreet roof terrace, which is set into the roof surface to exercise another dialogue between privacy and openness. The entrance is shielded by a long, heavy, elevated wing wall that not only forms part of the ground floor and sideboard enclosure but also embraces an interior courtyard with an entry pond. This allows the east facade to be completely opened up over two stories while being visually almost inaccessible from the street. The deck and zero-edge pool cantilever over the steep hillside and are extensions of the floor plans rather than landscape elements. This enhances the continuous interplay between interior and exterior throughout the house and artificially increases the footprint. The material vocabulary of the project is reduced to three related elements. The extensive glazing, with its reflective and transparent surfaces and thin dark glazing frames, is starkly contrasted by white stucco facades. Wooden slats serve as a textural mediator through the use of parametrically generated undulation. Inside, material contrasts continue. Expressed through sharp-edged geometries and articulated datum, juxtapositions of white stucco, grey stone, and soft, warm wood surfaces unfold throughout.

Y Duplex Penthouse
Pitsou Kedem Architect

This is a small yet complex project of a duplex apartment renovation that was, for the architects, an especially challenging project. How would it be possible to install meaning and architectural values to a roof top apartment in a “standard” uninspired design multi-story building located amongst a row of similar structures in one of Tel Aviv’s bourgeois neighborhoods The apartment was designed to integrate with the architectural language and characteristics of other projects by the architectural firm and thus, using modern architectural values, it combines modern elements by using materials in their raw form: exposed concrete wall, iron stairs and furniture, a terrazzo floor, poured on-site and unpainted wood.

Ming House
LGZ Taller de Arquitectura

The design of the house generates a perception of spaciousness well above the square meters of actual construction. Each one of the generated spaces follow the priority of extending the sight lines: the long entrance corridor that elongates through a linear garden outside; the long stairs that links the second level with the first one and continues towards the length of the swimming pool; every distributing zone visually reaching a perspective of the inner patio. The ample roof heights, as well as the design of ceilings emphasize the perceived spaciality, contributing to this factor also the strategic positioning of windows and skylights, which enhance natural light while blocking the not-so-engaging views of nearby built context and framing the better views of natural background. The simplicity of the exterior form reflects the inwardly attitude of the house: closed from the outside world, safely open from the inside. Materials alternate in series of contrasting themes that articulate interior and exterior design: from the white purity of the walls, through the dark stone tones of the floor, the sandy colors of the main wall that connects the main length of the project, to the natural wood tones in furniture, decks and art objects. Nature flows in and around the house and enriches it. The posterior garden is populated by native plants (from grasses, shrubs, oak trees) which have low maintenance and water requirements. The interior patio affords great views of the green wall from the first and second floor bringing shadow, freshness and relaxing views to every interior space in the house.

Armandale House 1
Mitsuori Architects

Our clients, a professional builder and his family called for an elegant and striking contemporary design solution to transform this compact double fronted Victorian style house into a generous family home. 
The design concept proposed a sculptural two level addition that connects seamlessly to the north facing landscaped courtyard, terrace and garden. Special consideration was given to preserving the historical streetscape, with the new addition separated from the existing building by a glazed walkway to acheive a large street setback making the new addition invisible from the front. 
 The architectural solution utlises series of simple folded planes to define spaces, control views, shade windows, and articulate the form of the building so as to reduce the visual impact of the first floor when viewed from the rear garden. This is a design that appears simultaneously striking or discreet depending on where it is viewed from. 
 This project was designed in close collaboration with our client, a professional builder with a focus on construction detailing and buildability. The rigour and practicalities of the building process were present from the outset and informed the original design concept. As architects with a keen interest in the building process, we found this particularly rewarding and engaging.

Bundaroo House
Tziallas Omeara Architecture Studio

The brief for this project was to design a beautiful addition to a heritage listed Bowral cottage - one which was private and allowed the existing cottage to appear unchanged from the street. The clients were passionate about restoration of the original parts of the building, and replacing the dysfunctional 1980's addition to the rear of the building. The additions were to maximise the solar-passive performance of the house, create a large entertainers kitchen in the heart of the home, allow for a new living and dining area, provide for a new sunken media room and guest accommodation. The client was keen to explore a contemporary approach to the new work, allowing for the new addition to juxtapose with the original weatherboard cottage. Most importantly, the house had to 'work well' from an environmental performance perspective. The new additions have been detailed to eliminate thermal bridging, create a well insulated and airtight envelope and to maximise passive solar heat gain and natural cross ventilation. The house has been designed to capture the sunlight in winter, and to exclude it from heating up the spaces in summer. A geo-thermal heat recovery system heats the pool, floor slab and domestic hot water and 35kW of solar panels provide more electricity than the occupants are likely to use (feeding the surplus back into the grid). A charging station in the garage powers an electric vehicle.

Hope Street Geelong West
Steve Domoney Architecture

This unusually wide site of generous proportions accommodating only a modest single level weatherboard period cottage, afforded the opportunity to develop the site to best suit the needs of a growing family. In retaining the existing cottage, due respect has been paid to the rhythm of existing heritage cottages along the streetscape. Historic threads are made evident and are read from the street with the new contemporary portions of the house, now in conversation with the old. The new is clearly defined against the existing through the application of tonal contrast. The old is treated in monotonic white, whilst the new presents itself in a relieving charcoal toning behind. This charcoal undertone extends throughout the interior of the new work providing a canvas, to which lively primary colours are applied throughout. These played out in both the fixed joinery elements and loose furniture selections of interior designer Andrew Parr. Now fused, the existing and new portions of the house provide very different opportunities for use, the existing smaller rooms of the cottage serve appropriately to accommodate the bedroom and utility spaces of the house, whilst the new; over a two level rise; provide a more open flowing arrangement of space, visually interconnected and conducive to the needs of a contemporary young family. The integration of the garden spaces and pool with the house is achieved through a transitional outdoor covered area, extending through both levels and punctuated by an enclosing vertical timber battened screen, this offering protection from the elements for outdoor activity and a filter to sunlight entering the interior. The completed home offers robust family accommodation without compromising the qualities necessary to provide a stimulating space for daily life.

Bungalow Court Brighton
Steve Domoney Architecture

Set in a quiet leafy cul-de-sac in the bay side suburb of Brighton, the first glimpse captured of our Bungalow Court project is of the kite-like roof canopy sailing aloft a solid upper level ‘hull’. It hovers seemingly unsupported, with only the presence of a narrow band of horizontal glazing beneath to suggest a connection to the solid form below. The intentionally whimsical form the roof assumes, signals the design response reinforced throughout this free flowing family home. We aimed to engender an air of relaxed sophistication, a calm welcoming place that would stimulate the senses and instil a sense of wellbeing.

Itoman Gyomin Syokudo
Yamazaki Kentaro Design Workshop

The Itoman Gyomin Shokudo, located in Itoman, Okinawa was conceived with the aim of supporting and promoting the local tradition and culture through its cuisine. The restaurant is covered in Ryukyu limestone and was constructed as part of a "masonry workshop" organized by the project collaborators. The fishermen in Itoman often constructed their own fishery grounds by hand using Ryukyu limestone. For this reason, we adopted the traditional construction method of "Nozura-Zatsuzumi" to construct the facade with the help of local workshop participants. Using the techniques of their ancestors they have imbued the structure with the pride and love of fishermen.

Olivomare Restaurant
Pierluigi Piu

Olivomare is one of a handful of restaurants encompassed by the London brand Olivo. Each restaurant offers a unique menu, and Olivomare offers a premiere seafood-only based selection of foods. The decor is meant to reflect the elegant simplicity of the dishes being prepared. The restaurant is primarily clad in white, exuding a pristine and contemporary atmosphere. The lighting is soft, indirect and ambient, like that of sunlight as seen from underwater. It flows down recessed edges in the ceiling, permeates through an overhead skylight and filters between a tentacle-like ceiling detail. The modern interior repeatedly uses patterns and textures that reference an underwater seascape. The wall of the lobby uses a white, diamond-shaped partition reminiscent of fishing nets. Opposite of the partition is the main dining room with a bold accent wall of what appears to be a condensed school of fish, the pattern inspired by Escher. Another section of the dining room is engulfed in a white, undulating wall, evoking the sandy surface of a windswept beach. Lastly, the bathroom area reinterprets a coral reef in large, scaled red patterning.

Ace Hotel Downtown LA
Commune

Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles opens in the historic United Artists building in Downtown LA. Built in 1927 for the maverick film studio, the ornate, storied theatre and tower stand as monuments to a group of seminal American artists pushing out on their own, and anchors the Broadway Theater District’s modern renaissance. United Artists co-founder Mary Pickford's love for the ornate detail and stone spires of Spanish castles and cathedrals is manifest at the theatre. It’s a true temple of the arts. The mixture of reverent awe and irreverent independence.

Into the Light Hotel
A31

Responding to the challenge to create a space that would bring together all that is best in a hotel which is integrated in the Greek landscape and at the same time derives from it, A31 focused on the Greek Light, drawing inspiration for creation and functionality. The materials used are aligned with the essentialism that can be detected in the scenery, allowing to the light and its natural advantage to emerge and thrive. At the same time, the use of slim materials is consistent with the new construction ethics that prevent excess usage of raw materials, while making the building eco-wiser and lighter.

Enjoy Concrete HQ
Govaert & Vanhoutte Architects

Enjoy Concrete produces and installs architectural prefabricated concrete elements. The brief for their new corporate building was to combine a production hanger together with offices, while integrating their own product within the building. Being on a strategic point in between an industrial estate and a green canal, they wanted to be seen by the passing traffic, as well as to become a transition from green to industrial.